Codename: Zosha a Review ( An Inspiring Story; I loved it)


zosha

About the Author: 

Yehudit Kafri Meiri is a 20th-21st century Israeli poet and a writer, as well as editor and translator. She was born in 1935 and lived as a child in Kibbutz Ein HaHoresh, where her parents were founding members. Yehudit belonged to the first group of children born in this kibbutz.

After she got married, she moved to Kibbutz Sasa, where she wrote her first book, The Time Will Have Mercy, which was published in 1962, one year after she moved to Kibbutz Shoval with her family. In Kibbutz Shoval she published a few more poetry books and children’s books and made her first attempt at writing prose including a book describing her childhood memories, All The Summer We Went Barefoot, which was successful and sold several editions.

Yehudit Kafri, mother of three and grandmother of five, has lived since 1989 with her husband in Mazkeret Batya, where she continues to write and publish books of poetry and biographies. In 2003 she published an historical biographic novel, Zosha: from the Jezreel Valley to the Red Orchestra, which tells the life story of Zosha Poznanska, who was a member of the Red Orchestra and eventually killed by the Gestapo. This novel won The Best Literary Achievement of the Year Prize in Israel. It has since been translated and published in English, and in Polish, and lately in Amazon.

Kafri published 9 poetry books and 9 others (children’s books, biographies, and prose). Poems by Yehudit Kafri were published in Hebrew, Arabic, English, Spanish, Croatian and Russian. Kafri has won several literary prizes including the Prime Minister’s prize in 1987, and other prizes.

About the book:

An unsung Jewish heroine of World War II

Her daring activity in the Red Orchestra and the heroic struggle in a Gestapo prison.

Zosha Poznanska was recruited into the Soviet spy network known as the Red Orchestra, which operated in Western Europe. It was on the eve of World Rar II and Zosha was part of the inner core of the network, a third of whose members were Jews. Apparently unaware of the Jews’ participation in the Red Orchestra, Hitler declared, “The Bolsheviks surpass us in one area alone: espionage!” and he commanded his counterspies to eradicate this network at all costs.

This book tells the story of Zosha through all the chapters of her short life: childhood, the Hashomer Hatzair youth movement in Poland, Eretz Israel and the PKP in the 1920s, Europe in the 1930s and the Red Orchestra. It tells her loves, her relationships with family and friends, her daring activity in the Red Orchestra and her heroic struggle in a Gestapo prison. The State of Israel posthumously awarded Zosha a medal of honor for fighting the Nazis.

Zosha Poznanska is an unsung Jewish heroine of World War II. Born in Kalisz Poland, she immigrated to Israel as a pioneer and for a brief time belonged to the group that founded Kibbutz Mishmar Ha’emek. Afterwards, she joined the Palestine Communist Party (Palestiner Kumunistishe Partie in Yiddish, abbreviated PKP), and from 1930 until her death she lived in France and Belgium.

My Review:
I was given this book for my unbiased review and I can honestly say it was one of my favorite WWII books.

What a truly impressive novel. I think this might be one of the most important example of historical WWII; yes I am including Schindler’s List. I enjoyed this book more than others I have read because it is more culturally rich and, frankly, it’s about a strong resilient woman.

I commend the author for bringing this woman’s life and sharing her unbelievable story. Zosha would make an excellent film, but the film needs to show her as strong as she is the in the novel and give the author the respect she deserves for this well written novel. I plan on having our book club read this book in this Fall! 5 STARS

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