Edible Geography One Plate at a Time


adventure book club

Logan & Sophia love to cook; so when started studying World Geography it had to involve food. We found several books at our local library that were loaded with recipes from all over the world for instance The Kids Around the World Cookbook. We also found an excellent series of books Kids in the Kitchen that share recipes along with a brief history of the food in part of the world.

We decided to choose the continent of Asia for our edible geography trip.  China the largest country on Earth seemed to be a the perfect place to start.

Some Interesting Facts about China & their Food:

  • More rice and wheat are grown there than any other place in the world
  • Over 1 Billion people live in China (there only 319 million people who live in the US)
  • China is one of the oldest civilizations dating back almost 4,000 years.
  • Meals are not eaten courses like most other countries it is served all at once.
  • Instead of forks and knives, the Chinese people use chopsticks.
  • The Wok is one of the most important utensils in Chinese cooking.

mooncake

The Chinese people love their food and it is the center of, or at least it accompanies or symbolizes, many social interactions.   In Mid-September, Chinese people all over the world celebrate the full moon and the coming of autumn. During this celebration the children of China are told the story of the moon fairy living in a crystal palace, who comes out to dance on the moon’s shadowed surface. The legend surrounding the “lady living in the moon” dates back to ancient times, to a day when ten suns appeared at once in the sky. The Emperor ordered a famous archer to shoot down the nine extra suns. Once the task was accomplished, Goddess of Western Heaven rewarded the archer with a pill that would make him immortal. However, his wife found the pill, took it, and was banished to the moon as a result. Legend says that her beauty is greatest on the day of the Moon festival.

A necessary treat at the  Moon Festival is a sweet pastry called a mooncake. Mooncakes are small pastries filled with a sweet paste filling – red bean or lotus seed. Now, as consumer’s taste buds changed there has been several new variations of the mooncake. .There is pandan (screw pine leaf) filling, coconut filling, meat fillings, nut and fruits filling, yam and even durian filling. For those who prefer cold treats, there are also ice-cream mooncakes!

Traditionally, the most popular form of mooncakes consumed is the ones stuffed with egg yolks. The yolks in the mooncake represent the full moon during the celebration. Although some people would heartily consume mooncakes filled with four egg yolks, many health conscious consumers rather opt for the less-sweet types of mooncakes. Traditionally, the most popular form of mooncakes consumed is the ones stuffed with egg yolks. The yolks in the mooncake represent the full moon during the celebration. Although some people would heartily consume mooncakes filled with four egg yolks, many health conscious consumers rather opt for the less-sweet types of mooncakes.

I want to give our readers full disclosure; we prepared several types mooncakes and even though they tasted wonderful they did not look very appetizing. We plan to try again real soon!

Below you will find some of our favorite Mooncake recipes:

Awayofmind Bakery House (found these to be very doable)

House of Annie

Anncoo Journal

Fine Dining Lovers

 

Checkout where my co-hosts traveled this month:

Kersandra from Our Adventure Story

Christa from Little Log Cottage School

Christina from Classroom to Homeroom

Jennifer from Faith & Good Works

8 thoughts on “Edible Geography One Plate at a Time

  1. This is fascinating. Thanks. I don’t believe I’ve ever heard of mooncakes before, but now I want to try them. Who couldn’t like something called a mooncake? 🙂

  2. Pingback: Celebrating the Fall Equinox | Waldorf Salad and Cottage Fries

  3. Pingback: 5 “Around the World” Storybooks with Activities and Resources | 5 “Around the World” Storybooks with Activities and Resources |

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